Children of the Corn of Day 16

Children of the Corn is based on a short story by Stephen King about a young couple driving through Nebraska who encounter a group of murderous children who are being led by a child priest named Isaac.

This movie is iconic in horror film history. We have creepy murderous kids, disorienting corn fields, extreme religious beliefs, Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton), and a mysterious being who demands sacrifice. You can see the shadows of this movie throughout the horror genre. Despite this, I found the movie boring and not outstanding in the least.

I wanted to know more about the children and the evil in the town rather than seeing an adult fight children. The mystery of “He Who Walks Behind the Rows” and the possible mass possession of a large number of people was the creepiness I wanted. Instead I feel like I watched a sub-par slasher movie.

I know this is not a popular opinion. Maybe I’ll watch it again in a few years and have a different viewing experience. However in 2020, Children of the Corn did not live up to my horror expectations.

If I were to get a job on the other side of the country, I would definitely drive cross country to get there. That being said, it would take A LOT for me to turn down a dirt lane into a cornfield without at least consulting a map. And if I did happen to turn down that road, I would be ruining someone’s corn as I turn around realizing I made the wrong decision. This movie did finally convince me to invest in a satellite phone if I decide to get out there and explore the more rural areas of the country. If I can drive 3 hours away from my house and not have service, I would be fool to drive across the country and not have plans for such an instance.

Things I learned:

  1. I need to get more comfortable with the idea of having to kill a child trying to murder me.
  2. Lock the car doors every time you get out of the car.
  3. Always check confusing signs against your map.
  4. If you find a kid surrounded by drawings of people getting killed, don’t ignore it.

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